School of Communication

Molly Losh

Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders

Jane and Michael Hoffman Associate Professor of Communication Sciences and Disorders
m-losh@northwestern.edu
Frances Searle Building
2240 Campus Drive
Evanston, IL 60208-3507
847-491-2431

Molly Losh's primary research interest focuses on delineating the nature and basis of language impairment in autism and related neurogenetic disorders. Her studies adopt clinical-behavioral and family-genetic methods and designs to characterize patterns of language strengths and weaknesses that define particular disorders, and examine ties to neuropsychological and genetic underpinnings.

Lab Affiliation

Neurodevelopmental Disabilities Laboratory

Education

PhD Developmental Psychology, UC Berkeley
BA Psychology, SDSU

Selected Publications

Losh, M., Adolphs, R., & Piven, J. (in press). The Broad Autism Phenotype. To appear in: Autism Spectrum Disorders (Eds. G. Dawson, D. Amaral, & D. Geschwind). Oxford University Press.

Losh, M., Esserman, D., & Piven, J. (2010). Rapid automatized naming as an index of genetic liability to autism. Journal of Neurodevelopmental Disorders 2, (2), 109-116. PMCID: PMC2922764

Couture, S., Penn, D., Losh, M., Adolphs, R., Hurley, R., & Piven, J. (2010) Comparison of social cognition in schizophrenia and high-functioning autism: More convergence than divergence. Psychological Medicine, 40(4) 569-579. PMCID: PMC2827676

Losh, M., Adolphs, R., Poe, M., Penn, D., & Piven, J. (2009). The Neuropsychological Profile of Autism and the Broad Autism Phenotype. Archives of General Psychiatry 66, 518-526. PMCID: PMC2699548

Losh, M., Sullivan, P., Trembath, Y., & Piven, J. (2008). Current developments in the genetics of autism: from phenome to genome. Journal of Neuropathology and Experimental Neurology, 67, 829-837. PMCID: PMC2649757

Current Grants

1R01MH091131-01A1 (PI: Losh, M.)  5/1/12-2/29/17
National Institute of Mental Health
A Family-Genetic Study of Autism and Fragile X Syndrome
This project aims to inform the role of the FMR1 gene in autism symptomatology through the study of children with autism andfragile X syndrome, and their first-degree relatives who are at increased genetic liability. 
Role: Principal Investigator

1R01DC010191-01A1 (PI: Losh, M.) 02/1/10-1/31/15
National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders
A Family-Genetic Study of Language in Autism
This project aims to identify specific linguistic markers of genetic liability to autism which may be used to illuminate the pathogenesis of autism and its component features.
Role: Principal Investigator

2 R01 HD038819-06A2 (PI: Martin, G.) 1/1/09 – 4/30/12
National Institute of Child Health and Human Development
Pragmatic Skills of Young Males and Females with Fragile X Syndrome
This study compares the developmental trajectories of pragmatic skills, the use of language in social contexts, among girls and boys with fragile X syndrome (FXS), Down syndrome (DS), and typical development (TD) and boys with autism spectrum disorder only (ASD-O) to determine whether individual differences in conversational discourse and narrative skills relate to FXS specifically or to either mental retardation (MR) or autism in general.
Role: Principal Investigator, subcontract